Nos publications depuis 2010

Nos publications depuis 2010

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HAL AgroResonance

 

HAL : Dernières publications

  • [hal-04238193] Transportable MRI to characterize water in plants directly in their natural environment

    Grasslands and forests mitigate global warming due to their high capacity to store carbon. Sap flows play a critical role by supplying water and mineral salts used for transpiration and photosynthesis (xylem) and transporting photosynthetic carbons (phloem) to carbon sinks (e.g., wood, roots, soil). In the context of global warming, a fine understanding of these transport mechanisms is necessary. However, a sensor able to locally probe water content and its movement directly on plants and in their natural environment (i.e., in situ) does not yet exist. To measure water properties non-invasively and in a given spatial volume, MRI is the analytical tool of choice. However, such instruments cannot be moved and only laboratory experiments can be performed. Recently, portable MRI instruments have been developed. To be able to move the MRI system, the magnetic field intensity is significantly decreased. Due to the necessity for innovative design and methods, few portable sensors can record the MRI signal in a slice with a thickness of a few dozen micrometers. Our study is based on one of these sensors, the unilateral NMR-MOUSE, customized with a home-designed vector to place the MRI device against the object to be studied. Our objective is then to evaluate the capacity of this MRI sensor to measure water, both its repartition and flow, in plants, in their natural environment. In this presentation, I will show (i) the technical challenges we had to overcome to perform measurements outside, and (ii) the interest of this sensor to monitor water status in living systems, and demonstrate its interest as a new sensor in the ecophysiological sciences.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Guilhem Pagès) 12 Oct 2023

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-04238193
  • [hal-04438419] In vitro monitoring of sodium release during carrots chewing: influence of salting practices

    Overconsumption of salt is a major concern due to its consequences on human health. Approximately 9 to 12 grams of salt are consumed worldwide per adult and per day whereas recommendations for salt intake are less than 5 g/day for adults [1]. Excessive intake of dietary salt is a major contributor to increased blood pressure which is the leading risk of death in the world [2]. A reduction in salt intake is one of the most important strategies for improving public health and preventing people from dying or suffering from strokes, heart attacks, and heart failure [3]. Discretionary salt contributes significantly to salt intake but has received very little attention so far and it is not clearly targeted by recommendations. The transdisciplinary research project Sal&Mieux aims at optimizing the use of discretionary salt by citizens when cooking and seasoning to contribute to lower the dietary sodium intake. One objective of the Sal&Mieux project is to determine whether optimized domestic cooking practices can maintain discretionary salt use. We set up studies on carrots cooked in water and modulate salt addition, either at a regular or reduced level, and either during or after the cooking process. In addition, three types of salt were compared: Fleur de sel, fine sea salt, and micronized salt. Sensory evaluation with untrained panelists showed that whatever the salt level, a higher salty taste intensity was perceived when salt was added after cooking [4]. A hypothesis to explain these results is that adding salt after cooking leads to a heterogeneous distribution of salt at the surface of the food matrix [5], which produces a pulse of saltiness at the beginning of the food oral processing [6]. To confirm this hypothesis, we set up an experiment to monitor the release of salt during the mastication of carrots prepared following the different salting conditions. To control the masticatory process and ensure reproducibility, salt release monitoring was performed in vitro using an artificial mouth that simulates human food oral processing [7]. The artificial mouth is made of two jaws filled with 3D-printed teethes and an artificial tongue; artificial saliva is used to mimic human saliva. To record salt release kinetic, a sample of saliva was taken at each mastication cycle, up to 12 cycles, and analyzed by Ionic Chromatography equipped with a conductimetric probe. Preliminary results showed differences in sodium release kinetic depending on salting practices. They will be further discussed to draw conclusions on the mechanisms supporting saltiness perception as a function of salt heterogeneity, salt crystal size, and salt level. These results should lead to identifying the best salting practices suitable for domestic conditions.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Raphaël Monod) 05 Feb 2024

    https://hal.science/hal-04438419
  • [hal-04273896] Diminuer la consommation de sel : vers une acceptabilité sociale ?

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    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Sylvie Clerjon) 07 Nov 2023

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-04273896
  • [hal-04235727] MUTANT : a new image filtering paradigm for improved parameters determination. Application to myelin water fraction mapping and sodium concentrations imaging

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    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (J.-M. Bonny) 10 Oct 2023

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-04235727
  • [hal-04393313] Influence of domestic salting practices on saltiness perception of cooked foods

    Overconsumption of table salt is a social concern due to its consequences on human health. Discretionary salt contributes to salt intake but has received very little attention so far and it is not precisely targeted by recommendations. To determine whether domestic culinary practices can be improved to increase saltiness perception while reducing salt content, we set up two studies, each one focusing on one widely consumed foodstuff, namely carrots or pasta. Raw carrots and dry pasta were thermally processed (“cooked”) in boiling water. Table salt was added either during or after cooking. Three types of salt were compared (fleur de sel, fine sea salt, and micronized salt) at two concentrations (“regular” and “reduced”). Ionic chromatography measurements were performed to control that the overall sodium contents of carrots and of pasta were similar between conditions at the same salt concentration. 40°C samples of carrots and pasta were submitted to sensory evaluation, in dedicated sessions, with an external panel of 70 naïve participants. Saltiness, sweetness, sourness, bitterness and overall aroma were rated on linear scales. A Just-About-Right test was also performed to evaluate saltiness adequacy. Results from ANOVAs and multiple comparisons of means highlighted that salty taste intensity was significantly higher when salt was added after cooking compared to in cooking water, especially for the fleur de sel type of salt. Putative mechanisms related to salt availability in the mouth depending on the salting process, which could drive salt perception will be discussed. This study can be a basis for the improvement of salting practices, in terms of table salt use, which can easily be adopted by consumers to increase the sensory availability of discretionary salt whilst contributing to the worldwide effort to reduce dietary sodium intake. This work was supported by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR-19-CE21-0009 Sal&Mieux).

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Raphaël Monod) 05 Feb 2024

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-04393313
  • [hal-04272082] Subregional Nigral Neurodegeneration in Parkinson's Disease Using Multisite Longitudinal MRI

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    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Rahul Gaurav) 06 Nov 2023

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-04272082
  • [hal-04438380] Caractérisation de l'état de liaison du sel dans les pâtes alimentaires par RMN du sodium

    Public health organizations agree that excessive salt consumption is harmful to individuals. The SalEtMieux project aims to optimize salting practices among consumers. On one hand, it focuses on the relationship between salting and salty taste through sensory studies. On the other hand, it examines the connection between salt and the food matrix using sodium relaxometry NMR. The sensory study indicates that salting at the plate enhances the perception of salty taste. The results of this sodium NMR study seek to explain why.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Diamantino Agripino da Cunha) 05 Feb 2024

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-04438380
  • [hal-04133617] Measuring tree water content with a portable, unilateral magnet

    The use of MRI in the plant sciences has traditionally been limited due to the immobility of the devices, and restrictions with regard to sample size and shape. To overcome these limitations and to be able to study plants directly in their natural environment, we evaluated the capacities of a portable, unilateral magnet: The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Mobile Universal Surface Explorer (NMR-MOUSE), designed by Blümich et al. [1]. This device permits measuring the water NMR signal in a 100-micrometer slice, and by means of a built-in lift, the magnet can be moved to record an NMR profile within a depth of approximately 25-millimeters from the surface of the device. We tested its capacity to measure tree water content by following the dehydration dynamic of thirty cut branches from six different species and two different functional types. We also tested the device on four in-situ trees. There was a linear correlation between the integral of the MRI profiles obtained and the water content of the branches and trees. This correlation was present regardless of tree species or functional type. Using the profiles obtained on the branches, we then tested the capacity of the device to differentiate the conductive tissues, i.e. the xylem and phloem fluxes. The MRI profiles of the branches presented distinct peaks which corresponded to the xylem and phloem tissues, whose location was validated with x-ray microtomography imaging. In conclusion, the NMR-MOUSE is a promising candidate for measuring tree water dynamics in the field.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Shannan Blystone) 20 Jun 2023

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-04133617
  • [hal-04235665] Exploring the Impact of Food Choice on Brain Responses to Sweet Drinks using fMRI

    Eating behavior is influenced by automatic responses to contextual food cues 1. For example, the easy availability of tasty foods can stimulate eating behaviors by enhancing the reward experience. Such working hypothesis is supported by a previous study demonstrated that providing choice resulted in higher levels of both food liking and food intake compared to situations where individuals were randomly assigned a dessert option 2. To address this issue, we conducted a study involving human participants who were asked to assess the pleasantness of sweet commercial beverages in both repeated free-choice and forced-choice conditions. Participants judged pleasantness after drinking sweet commercial beverages in repeated free-and forced-choice conditions. High-resolution fMRI and multivariate pattern analysis techniques 3,4 were employed to examine how choice influenced the spatial patterns that encode categorical information related to the drinks (taste/flavor, likings). By utilizing actual tasteful stimuli instead of relying on food images 5 , our results point at population-level several significant modulations of cortical representations due to choice.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Jean-Marie Bonny) 10 Oct 2023

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-04235665
  • [hal-04133747] MEASURING TREE WATER CONTENT AND LOCATING CONDUCTIVE TISSUES WITH PORTABLE MRI

    The use of MRI in the plant sciences has traditionally been limited due to the immobility of the devices, and restrictions with regard to sample size and shape. To overcome these limitations and to be able to study plants directly in their natural environment, we evaluated the capacities of a portable, unilateral magnet: The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Mobile Universal Surface Explorer (NMR-MOUSE), designed by Blümich et al. [1] and commercialized by Magritek. This MRI device permits measuring the signal in increments of up to 100-micrometers, and within a depth of approximately 25-millimeters. We tested its capacity to measure tree water content by following the dehydration dynamic of cut branches from six different species and two different functional types. We also tested the device on four in-situ trees. There was a significant linear correlation between the integral of the MRI profiles obtained and the water content of the branches and trees. This significant correlation was present regardless of tree species or functional type. We then tested the capacity of the device to differentiate the conductive tissues, i.e. the xylem and phloem fluxes, within cut branches. The MRI profiles of the branches presented distinct peaks which corresponded to the xylem and phloem tissues, whose location was validated with x-ray microtomography imaging which allows the high-resolution visualization of the tissues within the sample. In conclusion, the NMR-MOUSE is a promising candidate for measuring plant water dynamics in the field.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (S Blystone) 20 Jun 2023

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-04133747
  • [hal-04117301] Measuring tree water content in-situ with a portable, unilateral magnet

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    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Shannan Blystone) 05 Jun 2023

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-04117301
  • [hal-04115255] Caractérisation de l'état de liaison du sel dans les produits alimentaires par relaxométrie RMN du 23Na

    La quantité sel dans notre alimentation reste trop élevée et les organismes de santé publique recommandent sa diminution. Le projet ANR Sal&Mieux cherche des leviers de diminution à l’échelle domestique. Les travaux présentés ici visent à comprendre les liens entre type de salage et sensation salée, l’objectif étant de saler moins sans perte du goût salé. Les études sensorielles montrent que le salage à l’assiette fait ressortir le goût salé, la relaxométrie RMN a pour objectif de nous faire comprendre pourquoi en fournissant des informations sur l’état de liaison du sodium à la matrice alimentaire. Les résultats présentés ici ont été obtenus sur i. la carotte entière et ii. les pâtes alimentaires, pour 2 types de salage : eau (salage dans l’eau de cuisson) et assiette (salage après cuisson). La relaxométrie RMN a été réalisée à 400 MHz (Bruker UltraShielded widebore magnet) avec une sonde volumique 1H/23Na 5 mm large bande (BBO, Bruker BioSpin). La relaxation du sodium dans les échantillons est caractérisée à partir d’une séquence mettant en évidence les cohérences double quanta (mesure à opt=2.5ms, TR=1s, NS=4096), et d’une CPMG à phase alternée (TE=140μs, TR=1s, NS=4096). L’analyse des données de la CPMG est réalisée par un justement multi-exponentiel, sans apriori (NNLS), de la décroissance avec une régularisation fixe standard (=0.02). L’analyse statistique des données s’appuie sur un modèle linéaire généralisé intégrant l’ensemble des prédicteurs potentiels. Un effet salage significatif est visible sur la répartition des T2 pour les deux aliments ; De plus, un signal double quanta est détecté sur les 2 aliments quel que soit le type de salage. Ces travaux sont financés par le projet Sal&Mieux ANR-19-CE21-0009.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Sylvie Clerjon) 02 Jun 2023

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-04115255
  • [hal-04235819] Manganese-Enhanced MRI for Functional Imaging of Freely Moving Animals

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    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Jean-Marie Bonny) 10 Oct 2023

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-04235819
  • [hal-04086942] Evaluer la réponse thérapeutique tumorale : intérêt d'une approche bimodale en IRM CEST et imagerie nucléaire

    Evaluer la réponse thérapeutique tumorale : intérêt d’une approche bimodale en IRM CEST et imagerie nucléaire. Roxane Autissier1,2,3, Guilhem Pagés2,3, Erwan Boutault1, Jean-Marie Bonny2,3, Sébastien Schmitt1, Philippe Auzeloux1, Emmanuel Moreau1, Aurélie Dutour4, Elisabeth Miot-Noirault1, Leslie Mazuel1,2,3. 1 Université Clermont Auvergne, Inserm, IMoST, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France INRAe, 2 UR QuaPA, F-63122 Saint-Genès-Champanelle, France 3AgroResonance, INRAe, 2018. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Facility for agronomy, food and health, https://doi.org/10.15454/1.5572398324758228E123,4 4Team Cell Death and Pediatric Cancer, Cancer Initiation and Tumor Cell Identity Department, INSERM1052, CNRS5286, Cancer Research Center of Lyon, F-69008 Lyon, France Objectifs : Le chondrosarcome (CHS), tumeur maligne du cartilage, dispose d’un microenvironnement caractérisé par une matrice extracellulaire (MEC) riche en glycosaminoglycanes (GAGs) et par un cœur hypoxique. Ces deux caractéristiques sont identifiables par une stratégie d’acquisitions bimodales par IRM CEST et imagerie nucléaire [1]. Dans ce contexte, nous souhaitons évaluer la pertinence de cette stratégie pour déceler les modifications ayant lieu au sein de la tumeur en réponse à une thérapie ciblant la MEC (acide zolédronique) ou l’hypoxie (TH-302). Matériels et Méthodes : Les rats SD OFA implantés en paratibial avec un fragment de CHS (SWARM) sont traités ensuite par 2 injections/semaine d’acide zolédronique (0,1mg/kg, sc, J5-J36) ou 5 injections/semaine de TH-302 (Evofosphamide) (50mg/kg, ip, J11-J22) ou de sérum physiologique. Les animaux sont imagés hebdomadairement jusqu’à J40 par IRM à 11,7T. Un repérage anatomique puis une séquence RARE comprenant un module de préparation CEST (B1=1,5µT, tsat=4 s, Δω=50Hz sur  2500 Hz) est réalisée sur une coupe axiale passant par le centre de la tumeur. Une carte B0 est enregistrée à l’aide d’une WASSR (B1=0,1µT, tsat=1s, Δω=20Hz sur 1000Hz). Des imageries TEMP (99mTc-NTP15-5, 30MBq/animal, 30min pi) et TEP (18F-FMISO, 20MBq/animal, 4h pi) sont réalisées sur les mêmes animaux pour caractériser les GAGs et l’hypoxie, respectivement. Les tumeurs prélevées sont étudiées par histologie, immunofluorescence et dosage des GAGs. Résultats : L’approche bimodale a permis de mettre en évidence la réponse du CHS SWARM au traitement TH-302 avec une réduction significative de 75% du volume tumoral (p<0,0001). Les valeurs de pH (ratio APT/guanidyl CEST; p<0,05) et d’hypoxie (ratio T/M 18F-FMISO) dans le groupe traité au TH-302 sont plus élevées que dans le groupe contrôle. Le TH-302 a un impact sur la MEC avec une augmentation des GAGs montrée par imagerie nucléaire au 99mTc-NTP 15-5 (ratio T/M ; p<0,01). L’absence de variations des paramètres observables par imagerie confirme la non-réponse au traitement à l’acide zolédronique dans ce modèle. Conclusion : Ces résultats soulignent l’intérêt d’associer ces imageries pour le suivi de la réponse thérapeutique. Cette stratégie pourrait être déterminante dans l’adaptation thérapeutique des patients pour une médecine personnalisée. Références : [1] Autissier R, Mazuel L, Maubert E, et al. Simultaneous proteoglycans and hypoxia mapping of chondrosarcoma environment by frequency selective CEST MRI. Magn Reson Med. 2021;86(2):1008-1018. Remerciements : Ligue contre le cancer Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes. Ce travail a fait l’objet d’une thèse financé par le MESRI. Les acquisitions multimodales ont été réalisées sur la plateforme IVIA (https://doi.org/10.18145/ivia).

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Roxane Autissier) 03 May 2023

    https://hal.science/hal-04086942
  • [hal-04194256] Volumetric changes and clinical trajectories in Parkinson’s disease: a prospective multicentric study

    BackgroundLongitudinal measures of structural brain changes using MRI in relation to clinical features and progression patterns in PD have been assessed in previous studies, but few were conducted in well-defined and large cohorts, including prospective clinical assessments of both motor and non-motor symptoms.ObjectiveWe aimed to identify brain volumetric changes characterizing PD patients, and determine whether regional brain volumetric characteristics at baseline can predict motor, psycho-behavioral and cognitive evolution at one year in a prospective cohort of PD patients.MethodsIn this multicentric 1 year longitudinal study, PD patients and healthy controls from the MPI-R2* cohort were assessed for demographical, clinical and brain volumetric characteristics. Distinct subgroups of PD patients according to motor, cognitive and psycho-behavioral evolution were identified at the end of follow-up.ResultsOne hundred and fifty PD patients and 73 control subjects were included in our analysis. Over one year, there was no significant difference in volume variations between PD and control subjects, regardless of the brain region considered. However, we observed a reduction in posterior cingulate cortex volume at baseline in PD patients with motor deterioration at one year (p = 0.017). We also observed a bilateral reduction of the volume of the amygdala (p = 0.015 and p = 0.041) and hippocampus (p = 0.015 and p = 0.053) at baseline in patients with psycho-behavioral deterioration, regardless of age, dopaminergic treatment and center.ConclusionBrain volumetric characteristics at baseline may predict clinical trajectories at 1 year in PD as posterior cingulate cortex atrophy was associated with motor decline, while amygdala and hippocampus atrophy were associated with psycho-behavioral decline.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Ana Marques) 02 Sep 2023

    https://hal.science/hal-04194256
  • [hal-03894036] Reproductibilité en IRM quantitative

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    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Hélène Ratiney) 12 Dec 2022

    https://hal.science/hal-03894036
  • [hal-03940951] In Silico modelling of the salmon salting process to reduce saline effluent

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    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Jason Sicard) 16 Jan 2023

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03940951
  • [hal-03857408] Effect of dry salt versus brine injection plus dry salt on the physicochemical characteristics of smoked salmon after filleting

    Smoked fish fillets are pre-salted as a food conservation and quality preservation measure. Here we investigated biochemical and sensory aspects of smoked salmon fillets. Left-side salmon fillets were dry-salted while the rightside fillets underwent a mixed salting method consisting of an injection of saturated brine followed by surface application of dry salt. After 6 h of salting, all the fillets were smoked. At each step of the process, quality was evaluated using instrumental measurements (pH, color, texture, water content, salt content, a w), and lipid distribution was visualized by MRI. Mixed-salted fillets had a higher salt content than dry-salted fillets and variability in salt distribution was dependent on the salting process. However, these variations had no effect on pH, color or texture, which showed similar values regardless of salting method. Fatty areas had a lower salt content due to slower diffusion of aqueous salt solutions through them. Mixed salting speeds up the salting of the muscle without significantly affecting the quality traits of the salmon fillet.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Thierry Astruc) 17 Nov 2022

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03857408
  • [hal-03822564] A general paradigm for constructing adaptive and efficient multispectral imaging filters: applications to nuclear magnetic relaxometry in brain

    Based on the Bayesian theorem, we introduced a new paradigm for the design of highperformance image filters. This comprehensive statistical framework is applicable to most imaging modalities where multispectral images, that is, frames with different contrasts, can be acquired from the same subject, or sample, under investigation. Unlike the classical nonlocal filtering approaches [1,2], our formalism permits incorporation of adaptive fusion operators to calculate and merge the frame-dependent weights within the multispectral images. We show that the conventional, and widely used, multispectral nonlocal means filtering represents only a special case of our generalized framework. Through extensive numerical and in-vivo analyses, conducted on NMR images for myelin water fraction (MWF) determination, we demonstrate the flexibility and superior performance of our formalism for accurate and precise MWF mapping. Our results indicate that the use of adaptive fusion operators provides an advanced degree of freedom for the multispectral filtering leading to higher quality filtering with details preservation in derived MWF maps as compared to the conventional approaches. We also provide a mathematically based formulation for the calculation of the weight of the central voxel for which the signal intensity has to be restored. This issue has previously been overlooked, with only empirical solutions have been suggested. Our definition of the selfsimilarity here is easily extendable to various fusion operators and addresses this outstanding issue. This work opens the way to further stabilize quantitative MR imaging for advanced applications in many fields such as preclinical and clinical investigations. We note that, beside MR imaging applications, our filtering paradigm is readily applicable to other multispectral imaging modalities.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (J.-M. Bonny) 20 Oct 2022

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03822564
  • [hal-03822537] A portable and unilateral NMR device to measure tree water content and locate conductive tissues

    [...]

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Shannan Blystone) 20 Oct 2022

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03822537
  • [hal-03822545] A portable and unilateral nmr device to measure tree water and locate conductive tissues

    [...]

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Shannan Blystone) 20 Oct 2022

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03822545
  • [hal-03822552] A general paradigm for constructing adaptative and efficient multispectral imaging filters: Applications to NMR relaxometry in brain

    [...]

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (J.-M. Bonny) 20 Oct 2022

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03822552
  • [hal-04438385] Sensory availability and perception of table salt added during or after the cooking process: a case study with cooked carrots

    Overconsumption of salt is a major concern due to its consequences on human health. Discretionary salt contributes significantly to salt intake but has received very little attention so far and it is not clearly targeted by recommendations. To determine whether domestic cooking practices can increase saltiness perception while reducing salt content, we set up a study on carrots cooked in a water bath. Salt was added either during or after the cooking process. Three types of salt were compared (Fleur de Sel, fine sea salt, and micronized salt) at two concentrations (regular and reduced). HPLC measurements were performed to control that overall salt content of carrots was similar between conditions at the same salt level. Pieces of carrots were submitted to sensory evaluation with an external panel. Participants had to rate salty taste intensity along with other descriptors. Preliminary data analyses tend to demonstrate that salty taste intensity was higher when the salt was added after the cooking process compared to in the cooking water. The influence of the type of salt is still to be analysed. Putative mechanisms related to salt availability and salt perception will be discussed. Expected results should allow to highlight practices in terms of table salt use, that can easily be adopted by consumers to increase the sensory availability of discretionary salt.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Raphaël Monod) 05 Feb 2024

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-04438385
  • [hal-03781364] Low-field mri: a useful tool to characterize water in intact plants

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    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Nuixe Magali) 20 Sep 2022

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03781364
  • [hal-03781345] Can metabolic mri be useful to image tomato metabolism?

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    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Guilhem Pagès) 20 Sep 2022

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03781345
  • [hal-04438344] Caractérisation de l'état de liaison du sel par spectroscopie RMN du noyau sodium Rapport de stage

    During these eleven weeks, my research aimed to contribute to the collaborative project Sal&Mieux. The purpose of this project is to optimize an reduce discretionary salt use, while making it more effective and maintaining salty taste and food appreciation. My mission was to characterize the salt binding state in carrots, cooked and salted in different ways, by sodium nucleus NMR spectroscopy. Thanks to NMR acquisitions carried out on a large number of samples, the transverse relaxation times of each sample type have been determined. Comparison of relaxation times between samples type give us sodium nucleus binding difference tendencies. The first relaxation time is slightly shorter for a « at the table » salted carrot than a whole carrot salted in water during cooking. This very short time is characteristic of stronger salt bindings with the food matrix. Sodium is therefore more bound when it is added to the plate. The longer relaxation time is also slightly longer for a whole carrot salted in water than for a carrot purée, salted in the same way. Food matrix nature itself, which is very different between those two types of food (purée vs whole carrot) could explain this difference. The main result is that salt could be differently perceived in food depending on the salting process and on the food structure. Sensory analyzes, carried out by project’s parteners on June 2022, will confirm or disprove our interpretations : sodium bindings’ nature influences salt perception. This project’s final results will show if our salt consumption can be reduced by optimizing our way to cook and season. However, differences between these relaxation times are weak. To increase the results’ reliability, we have to earn more data and undertake more advanced statistical analyses.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Camille Geliot) 05 Feb 2024

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-04438344
  • [hal-03695147] MRSI vs CEST MRI to understand tomato metabolism during fruit development: Is there a better contrast?

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    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Guilhem Pagès) 14 Jun 2022

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03695147
  • [hal-03882060] Glutamate cycle changes in the putamen of patients with de novo Parkinson's disease using 1H MRS

    Introduction: To investigate glutamatergic metabolism changes in the putamen of patients with de novo Parkin-son's Disease (PD) and test the hypothesis that glutamate (Glu) levels are abnormally elevated in the putamen contralateral to where the motor clinical signs predominate as expected from observations in animal models. Methods: H-1 NMR spectra from 17 healthy control volunteers were compared with spectra from 17 de novo PD patients of who 14 were evaluated again after 2-3 years of disease progression. Statistical analysis used random-effects models. Results: The only significant difference between PD patients and controls was a higher glutamine (Gln) con-centration in the putamen ipsilateral to the hemibody with predominant motor signs (Visit 1: 6.0 +/- 0.4 mM vs. 5.2 +/- 0.2 mM, p < 0.05; Visit 2: 6.2 +/- 0.3 mM vs. 5.2 +/- 0.2 mM, p < 0.05). At Visit 1, PD patients had higher Glu and Gln levels in the putamen ipsilateral versus contralateral to dominant clinical signs (Glu: 12.2 +/- 0.6 mM vs. 10.4 +/- 0.6 mM, p < 0.05; Gln: 6.0 +/- 0.4 mM vs. 4.8 +/- 0.4 mM, p < 0.05; Glu and Gln pool (Glx): 17.9 +/- 0.8 mM vs. 14.7 +/- 1.1 mM, p < 0.05). At Visit 2, the sum of the two metabolites remained significantly higher in the ipsilateral versus contralateral putamen (Glx: 18.3 +/- 0.6 mM vs. 16.1 +/- 0.9 mM, p < 0.05). Conclusion: In de novo PD patients, the putamen ipsilateral to the more affected hemibody showed elevated Gln versus controls and elevated Glu and Gln concentrations versus the contralateral side. Abnormalities in Glu metabolism therefore occur early in PD but unexpectedly in the putamen contralateral to the more damaged hemisphere, suggesting they are not dependent solely on dopamine loss.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Carine Chassain) 02 Dec 2022

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03882060
  • [hal-03757121] Characterization of sodium relaxation in food : a mandatory step to reach quantitative sodium images

    [...]

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Sylvie Clerjon) 22 Aug 2022

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03757121
  • [hal-03756884] MRSI vs CEST MRI to understand tomato metabolism during fruit development: Is there a better contrast ?

    [...]

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Guilhem Pagès) 22 Aug 2022

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03756884
  • [hal-03757144] Characterization of sodium relaxation in food: a mandatory step to reach quantitative sodium images

    [...]

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Sylvie Clerjon) 22 Aug 2022

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03757144
  • [hal-03613378] Characterization of the sodium binding state in several food products by 23 Na nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    In food, salt has several key roles including conservative and food perception. For this latter, it is well-known that the interaction of sodium with the food matrix modifies the consumer perception. It is then critical to characterize these interactions in various real foods. For this purpose, we exploited the information obtained on both single and double quantum 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. All salted food samples studied showed strong interactions with the food matrix leading to quadrupolar interactions. However, for some of them, the single quantum analysis did not match the theoretical prediction. This was explained by the presence of another type of sodium population, which did not produce quadrupolar interactions. This finding is of critical importance to perform quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to understand the consumer salty taste perception.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Nour El Sabbagh) 14 Apr 2023

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03613378
  • [hal-03647518] Structural and Functional Correlates of Hallucinations and Illusions in Parkinson’s Disease

    Background: Visual illusions (VI) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) are generally considered as an early feature of the psychosis spectrum leading to fully formed visual hallucinations (VH), although this sequential relationship has not been clearly demonstrated. Objective: We aimed to determine whether there are any overlapping, potentially graded patterns of structural and functional connectivity abnormalities in PD with VI and with VH. Such a finding would argue for a continuum between these entities, whereas distinct imaging features would suggest different neural underpinnings for the phenomena. Methods: In this case control study, we compared structural and resting state functional MRI brain patterns of PD patients with VH (PD-H, n = 20), with VI (PD-I, n = 19), and without VH or VI (PD-C, n = 23). Results: 1) PD-H had hypo-connectivity between the ILO and anterior cingulate precuneus and parahippocampal gyrus compared to PD-C and PD-I; 2) In contrast, PD-I had hyper-connectivity between the inferior frontal gyrus and the postcentral gyrus compared to PD-C and PD-H. Moreover, PD-I had higher levels of functional connectivity between the amygdala, hippocampus, insula, and fronto-temporal regions compared to PD-H, together with divergent patterns toward the cingulate. 3) Both PD-I and PD-H had functional hypo-connectivity between the lingual gyrus and the parahippocampal region vs. PD-C, and no significant grey matter volume differences was observed between PD-I and PD-H. Conclusion: Distinct patterns of functional connectivity characterized VI and VH in PD, suggesting that these two perceptual experiences, while probably linked and driven by at least some similar mechanisms, could reflect differing neural dysfunction.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Ana Luísa Marques) 20 Apr 2022

    https://hal.science/hal-03647518
  • [hal-03857470] Intrasubject subcortical quantitative referencing to boost MRI sensitivity to Parkinson's disease

    Several postmortem studies have shown iron accumulation in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease patients. Iron concentration can be estimated via MRI-R2∗ mapping. To assess the changes in R2∗ occurring in Parkinson's disease patients compared to controls, a multicentre transversal study was carried out on a large cohort of Parkinson's disease patients (n = 163) with matched controls (n = 82). In this study, 44 patients and 11 controls were removed due to motion artefacts, 21 patient and 6 controls to preserve matching. Thus, 98 patients and 65 age and sex-matched healthy subjects were selected with enough image quality. The study was conducted on patients with early to late stage Parkinson's disease. The images were acquired at 3Tesla in 12 clinical centres. R2∗ values were measured in subcortical regions of interest (substantia nigra, red nucleus, striatum, globus pallidus externus and globus pallidus internus) contralateral (dominant side) and ipsilateral (non dominant side) to the most clinically affected hemibody. As the observed inter-subject R2∗ variability was significantly higher than the disease effect, an original strategy (intrasubject subcortical quantitative referencing, ISQR) was developed using the measurement of R2∗ in the red nucleus as an intra-subject reference. R2∗ values significantly increased in Parkinson's disease patients when compared with controls; in the substantia nigra (SN) in the dominant side (D) and in the non dominant side (ND), respectively (PSN_D and PSN_ND < 0.0001). After stratification into four subgroups according to the disease duration, no significant R2∗ difference was found in all regions of interest when comparing Parkinson's disease subgroups. By applying our ISQR strategy, R2(ISQR)∗ values significantly increased in the substantia nigra (PSN_D and PSN_ND < 0.0001) when comparing all Parkinson's disease patients to controls. R2(ISQR)∗ values in the substantia nigra significantly increased with the disease duration (PSN_D = 0.01; PSN_ND = 0.03) as well as the severity of the disease (Hoehn & Yahr scale <2 and ≥ 2, PSN_D = 0.02). Additionally, correlations between R2(ISQR)∗ and clinical features, mainly related to the severity of the disease, were found. Our results support the use of ISQR to reduce variations not directly related to Parkinson's disease, supporting the concept that ISQR strategy is useful for the evaluation of Parkinson's disease.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Laila Khedher) 17 Nov 2022

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03857470
  • [hal-03537396] Quantitative sodium MRI in food: addressing sensitivity issues using single quantum chemical shift imaging at high field

    Selon divers organismes de santé, la consommation mondiale de sel est supérieure aux recommandations et doit être réduite. Idéalement, cela serait réalisé sans perdre le goût du sel lui-même. Afin d'atteindre cet objectif, tant au niveau industriel que domestique, nous devons comprendre les mécanismes qui régissent la distribution finale du sel dans les aliments. Les solutions in-silico utilisées aujourd'hui simplifient grandement la structure réelle des aliments. La mesure de la quantité de sodium au niveau local est essentielle pour comprendre la distribution du sodium. L'IRM du sodium, une approche non destructive, est le choix idéal pour la cartographie du sel tout au long du processus de transformation. Cependant, la faible sensibilité du noyau de sodium et ses courts temps de relaxation rendent cette imagerie difficile. Dans ce document, nous montrons comment l'IRM du sodium peut être utilisée pour mettre en évidence les hétérogénéités salines dans les produits alimentaires, à condition que la décroissance temporelle soit modélisée, corrigeant ainsi les différences de vitesse de relaxation. Nous proposons ensuite un abaque qui montre la relation entre le rapport signal sur bruit de l'IRM sodium, la concentration en sel, le champ B0 et les résolutions spatiale et temporelle. Cet abaque simplifie les choix judicieux lors de la mise en œuvre de l'IRM sodium.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Sylvie Clerjon) 14 Apr 2023

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03537396
  • [hal-03758348] Digestion du pain: rôle de la phase orale, de la variété de blé et du procédé de panification dans la modulation de la digestion du gluten de pain

    [...]

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Marie-Agnès Peyron) 23 Aug 2022

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03758348
  • [hal-03363454] Spurious phase correction in rapid metabolic imaging

    IDEAL-type magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) sequences require the acquisition of several datasets using optimized sampling in the time domain to reconstruct metabolite maps. Each unitary scan consists of a selective slice (2D) or slab (3D) excitation followed by an evolution time and then the acquisition of the spatially encoded signal. It is critical that the phase variation during the evolution time for each scan is only dependent on chemical shifts. In this paper, we described the apparition of spurious phase due to either the transmit or the receive frequency. The presence of this unwanted phase depends on (i) where the commutation between these two frequencies is performed and (ii) how it is done, as there are two phase commutation modes: continuous and coherent. We present the correction needed in function of the different cases. It appears that some solutions are universal. However, it is critical to know which case is implemented on the MRI scanner, which is not always easy information to have. We illustrated several cases with our preclinical MRI by using the IDEAL spiral method on a 13C phantom. © 2021 Elsevier Inc.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Nour El Sabbagh) 04 Oct 2021

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03363454
  • [hal-03579561] Quantitative sodium MRI in foods : addressing sensitivity issues using single quantum Chemical Shift Imaging at high field

    [...]

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Sylvie Clerjon) 18 Feb 2022

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03579561
  • [hal-04138768] Prédiction de la teneur en eau des racines par spectroscopie proche infra-rouge

    Prédiction de la teneur en eau des racines par spectroscopie proche infra-rouge Contexte Les racines des plantes assurent le transfert de l'eau du sol aux parties aériennes, ce qui permet l'hydratation des tissus de l'ensemble de la plante. La localisation des racines dans le sol rend difficile leurs suivis et en situation de stress hydrique, la coordination des flux d'eau entre les feuilles et les racines est peu renseignée.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Catherine Picon-Cochard) 23 Jun 2023

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-04138768
  • [hal-03419138] Can NMR become a tool of choice to study ecosystems directly in the fields?

    Grasslands and forests are the two main terrestrial ecosystems limiting the global warming thanks to their high capability to store carbon. Sap flows are playing a critical role by bringing the water and mineral salts used for transpiration and photosynthesis (xylem) and transporting the photosynthetic carbons (phloem) to the carbon sinks (e.g., wood, roots, soil). In the context of global warming, a fine understanding of these transport mechanisms is necessary. However, a sensor able to locally probe water content and its movement directly on the plants in their ecosystem (i.e., in situ) does not exist yet. To measure non-invasively and in a given spatial volume water properties, MRI is the analytical tool of choice. However, such instrument cannot be moved and only laboratory experiments can be performed. Recently, portable MRI have been developed. To be able to move the MRI system, the magnetic field intensity is significantly decreased. Thanks to special design and tricks, few portable sensors can record the MRI signal in a slice having a thickness of few tenths of micrometers. After choosing one of these devices, the NMR-MOUSE, we designed a vector allowing to move it and to position it directly against the plant in any positions. Our objective is then to evaluate the capabilities of this MRI sensor to measure water both repartition and ow in plants inside their natural environment. Before reaching this aim, it is necessary on one hand, to work on the MRI system to ensure robustness of in situ measurements and on the other hand, to gain knowledge on the sensor capabilities on model systems. The magnetic eld of such low-eld MRI systems is highly sensitive to temperature fuctuations. This is a critical point as a variation of the magnetic eld leads to a change in the slice position, i.e. the measurement is not performed inside the same volume. Such a problem is limited for indoor measurements where the temperature is regulated. However, for outdoor experiments it has to be corrected. We characterized the shift induced by a change of the temperature magnet and we are now developing solutions to correct it in real time. Our first experiments on agroecophysiological systems were performed on root systems of dierent grassland species. We demonstrated that the MRI sensor was able to detect water content variation during the cycle day /night. These circadian variations matched the reference methods used to obtain information on the root hydratation: soil relative humidity and leaf water potential. These data were completed by local transversal relaxation time measurements. We were then able to explain the variation observed with the MRI sensor by the plant water demand due to transpiration. Before measuring the xylem and phloem fows on trees, it is important to locate the position of the slice inside the tree. To do so, a good understanding of the MRI proles (MRI signal vs measurement depth) is mandatory. Such measurements were performed on dierent tree species in order to characterize the reaction, soft and hardwood on branches. In this presentation, I will give an overview of our progress on these different parts of the project.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Guilhem Pagès) 08 Nov 2021

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03419138
  • [hal-03377468] Assessment of the sensitivity of a low-field NMR sensor by characterizing root water status of an herbaceous plant under drought conditions

    [...]

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Magali Nuixe) 14 Oct 2021

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03377468
  • [hal-03369601] Benefit of multimodal MRI to follow in vivo tumor microenvironment changes during therapy

    [...]

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Roxane Autissier) 07 Oct 2021

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03369601
  • [hal-03757198] Correction de phase pour l'Imagerie Spectroscopique Rapide

    [...]

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Nour El Sabbagh) 22 Aug 2022

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03757198
  • [hal-03345202] TUMOR MICROENVIRONMENT IMAGING: MULTIMODALITY BENEFIT TO STUDY CHONDROSARCOMA

    [...]

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Roxane Autissier) 16 Sep 2021

    https://hal.science/hal-03345202
  • [hal-03334052] TUMOR MICROENVIRONMENT IMAGING: BENEFITS OF MULTIMODALITY TO STUDY CHONDROSARCOMA

    INTRODUCTION: Chondrosarcoma (CHS) is a malignant cartilaginous tumor representing the most common primary bone cancer in adults.[1] Due to its dense chondrogenic extracellular matrix and hypoxic environment, CHS is highly resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiation.[2] Development of multimodal imaging to characterize and map in vivo CHS microenvironment is fundamental for specific diagnosis and personalized therapy. In this work, we proposed to combine the resolution of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI with nuclear imaging sensitivity to improve CHS microenvironment understanding.[3] METHODS: Swarm rat CHSs were implanted subcutaneously in NMRI nude mice (n=10). When tumors were measurable (12-16 days post-transplant), mice were imaged by CEST MRI.[4] Proteoglycans, the main component of chondrogenic extracellular matrix, were quantified by GAG CEST contrast. Guanidyl-and APT CEST contrasts were combined to characterize acidic pH, as hypoxia reflect. These two features, proteoglycans and hypoxia, were assessed in parallel by nuclear imaging with 99m Tc-NTP 15-5 SPECT imaging [5] and

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Roxane Autissier) 03 Sep 2021

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03334052
  • [hal-03334046] Tumor microenvironment imaging: Benefits of multimodality to study chondrosarcoma

    Swarm rat CHSs were implanted subcutaneously in NMRI nude mice (n=10). When tumors were measurable (12-16 days post-transplant), mice were imaged by CEST MRI (Dou W et al., Quant Imaging Med Surg, 2019). Proteoglycans, the main component of chondrogenic extracellular matrix, were quantified by GAG CEST contrast. Guanidyl-and APT CEST contrasts were combined to characterize acidic pH, as hypoxia reflect. ☢ These two features, proteoglycans and hypoxia, were assessed in parallel by nuclear imaging with [ 99m Tc]Tc-NTP 15-5 SPECT imaging (Peyrode C et al., Sarcoma, 2011) and [ 18 F]-FMISO PET imaging (Rajendran JG et al., Clin Cancer Res, 2004), respectively. Data were also completed by ex vivo analyses of tumor and muscle proteoglycans (Alcian blue stain and biochemical assay with dimethylmethylene blue) and hypoxia (pimonidazole immunofluorescence). CONCLUSION: The results from CEST MRI, nuclear imaging and ex vivo analyses were in agreement and highlighted a rich proteoglycan extracellular matrix and a heterogeneous hypoxic tumoral microenvironment for Swarm rat CHS xenograft in mice. This study emphasizes the role of multimodal imaging to characterize tumor phenotypes resistant to treatments and allows a better understanding of the relationship between tumor cells and their environment. Grants: "La Ligue contre le Cancer Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes". All imaging experiments were performed at In Vivo Imaging Auvergne (IVIA) facility

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Roxane Autissier) 03 Sep 2021

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03334046
  • [hal-03334070] IRM quantitative de la concentration en proton et en sodium appliquée aux produits agroalimentaires

    [...]

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Sylvie Clerjon) 03 Sep 2021

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03334070
  • [hal-03331842] TUMOR MICROENVIRONMENT IMAGING: BENEFITS OF MULTIMODALITY TO STUDY CHONDROSARCOMA

    INTRODUCTION: Chondrosarcoma (CHS) is a malignant cartilaginous tumor representing the most common primary bone cancer in adults.[1] Due to its dense chondrogenic extracellular matrix and hypoxic environment, CHS is highly resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiation.[2] Development of multimodal imaging to characterize and map in vivo CHS microenvironment is fundamental for specific diagnosis and personalized therapy. In this work, we proposed to combine the resolution of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI with nuclear imaging sensitivity to improve CHS microenvironment understanding.[3] METHODS: Swarm rat CHSs were implanted subcutaneously in NMRI nude mice (n=10). When tumors were measurable (12-16 days post-transplant), mice were imaged by CEST MRI.[4] Proteoglycans, the main component of chondrogenic extracellular matrix, were quantified by GAG CEST contrast. Guanidyl-and APT CEST contrasts were combined to characterize acidic pH, as hypoxia reflect. These two features, proteoglycans and hypoxia, were assessed in parallel by nuclear imaging with 99m Tc-NTP 15-5 SPECT imaging [5] and 18F-FMISO PET imaging [6], respectively. Data were also completed by ex vivo analyses of proteoglycans (Alcian blue stain and biochemical assay with dimethylmethylene blue) and hypoxia (pimonidazole immunofluorescence). RESULTS/DISCUSSION: For extracellular matrix assessment, a proteoglycan concentration-related map was established with GAG CEST contrast showing more intense areas in the tumor than in the muscle (AUC =27.29 ± 8.38 vs 2.15 ± 1.88, respectively; P < 0.0001) (Fig 1). Similarly, a significant (P < 0.0001) radiotracer uptake was observed by nuclear imaging with 99mTc-NTP 15-5 within tumoral tissue (179.38 ± 38.39 kBq/mL) as opposed to muscle (35.07 ± 5.17 kBq/mL). These results were supported by biochemical assay (6.33 ± 1.60 μg/mg vs 0.41 ± 0.09 μg/mg, respectively; P < 0.0001). Considering hypoxia, a small discrepancy was observed between CHS and muscle with 18F-FMISO PET imaging. Interestingly, with Guanidyl and APT contrast, the weakly hypoxic status of the CHS was explained by a heterogeneous acidic pH distribution within the tumoral tissue (Fig 1). Moreover, immunofluorescence with pimonidazole evidenced a weak staining within tumor mainly localized in the center of CHS lobules. CONCLUSION: The results from CEST MRI, nuclear imaging and ex vivo analyses were in agreement and highlighted a rich proteoglycan extracellular matrix and a heterogeneous hypoxic tumoral microenvironment for Swarm rat CHS xenograft in mice. This study emphasizes the role of multimodal imaging to characterize tumor phenotypes resistant to treatments and allows a better understanding of the relationship between tumor cells and their environment.

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Roxane Autissier) 02 Sep 2021

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03331842
  • [hal-03347761] La RMN portable pour caractériser les racines de plantes prairiales

    Cette étude montre que la RMN portable permet de caractériser la structure des systèmes racinaires d'espèces prairiales contrastées mais également la fonction de ces racines

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Magali Nuixe) 21 Sep 2021

    https://hal.science/hal-03347761
  • [hal-03331827] LA RMN PORTABLE POUR CARACTERISER LES RACINES DE PLANTES PRAIRIALES

    [...]

    ano.nymous@ccsd.cnrs.fr.invalid (Magali Nuixe) 02 Sep 2021

    https://hal.inrae.fr/hal-03331827

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Pour une recherche plus systématique de nos travaux, voici également notre DOI :

10.15454/1.5572398324758228e12 

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Date de modification : 02 août 2023 | Date de création : 23 juin 2015 | Rédaction : AgroResonance